Tree Nut Allergy Panel

$138.30

his test evaluates for the presence of an allergy-related antibody known as immunoglobulin E (IgE) to

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Description

This test evaluates for the presence of an allergy-related antibody known as immunoglobulin E (IgE) to specific foods. Specific IgE antibodies trigger allergy symptoms to certain foods. IgE antibodies are normally found in small amounts in the blood, but higher amounts can be a sign of allergy.

This panel includes:

• Almond
• Brazil nut
• Cashew nut
• Hazelnut
• Macadamia nut
• Peanut
• Pecan nut
• Pistachio
• Walnut

Higher levels of IgEs can be detected whether or not you have recently eaten the particular food.

Allergic symptoms differ from person to person. Not every individual with high levels of IgE for a particular food will experience an allergic reaction to it.

Higher IgE antibody levels may mean you have a higher likelihood of having a food allergy. However, the level of IgE to a particular food does not necessarily indicate how severe an allergic reaction may be.

Different methods of allergy testing, for example, blood tests and skin prick tests, may produce different results. Certain medications may affect the results of a skin prick allergy test.

A positive result means IgE antibodies were detected in your blood for a particular food. It is recommended that any positive result be shared along with your medical history with a physician experienced in food allergy interpretation. Allergist locator tools are provided with your results.

This test does not require fasting.

How do I know if this test is right for me?

An allergic reaction to a particular food can range from uncomfortable to severe. Food allergy symptoms usually develop within a few minutes to a few hours after eating a particular food.
This test is right for you.

If you have any of these symptoms, this test may be right for you.

  • Tingling or itching in the mouth
  • Hives or eczema
  • Itching or swelling of the lips, face, tongue, and throat or other parts of the body
  • Wheezing
  • Nasal congestion or slight trouble breathing
  • Abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea, or vomiting
  • History of a mild allergic reaction to a particular food
This test may not be right for you.

If you experience these more severe symptoms, it’s best to see an allergist or physician trained in food allergy for your course of treatment.

  • Constriction and tightening of the airways
  • A swollen throat or the sensation of a lump in your throat that makes it difficult to breathe
  • A severe drop in blood pressure
  • Rapid pulse
  • Dizziness, lightheadedness
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Tingling or itching in the mouth